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This page Copyright © 2003-2011, by Mark Lawrence.
Email me, mark@calsci.com, with suggestions, additions, broken links.

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Superhawk Known Mechanical Issues

Regulator / Rectifiers are known to burn up.


Superhawk Road Tests
MotorcycleDaily MotorByte Motorsports Network



Superhawk Links

Alan Mascall VTR Site
Bob Quincy VTR Page
Dan & Chris's South Aussie SportsBike Page
Honda VTR1000
Honda VTR worshippers page - Home
Lorne Black's VTR Tail!(GB)
Magnus' Honda VTR1000 page(GB)
Our VTR Links Page
Rex VTR Page
Sport-Twin's Honda VTR1000 'Page!
The VTR Gallery - modifications
VTR FAQ - Aftermarket
VTR_page
links
The Girlie Biker Page
KAMware VTR1000F - Super Hawk - Fire Storm
The Superhawk Archives
Greg's Honda V-Twin
Yahoo UK Superhawk Forum
Yahoo Superhawk Owners
Yahoo UK Superhawk Forum
Yahoo UK Superhawk Forum
Yahoo UK Superhawk Forum



General

Ron Ayers.com has Honda parts at so-so discounts. You must have part numbers.

Cycle-parts.com has Honda parts at so-so discounts. You must have part numbers.

Ca Sport Touring.com has Honda parts at discount. You must have part numbers.
 


$19 from CopyShopExpress at Ebay



Suspension
 


Öhlins shock absorber. #SU 201, Type 46PRCS, Length 345mm, Stroke 75.5mm. Fully adjustable compression, rebound and hydraulic pre-load adjuster.
$955 from Motorcycle Pro Shop
 


Hyperpro shock absorber. Standard shock is rebound adjustable. Reservoir shock has high and low speed compression damping adjustment and rebound adjustment. Both have optional remote hydraulic pre-load adjustment.
SU10-007R $500 / SU10-107R $750 from Hyperpro
 


Touratech fork springs. #040-0463
$112 from Touratech
 
Öhlins fork springs. #08688-90, Length 448mm.
$??? from motorcycle Pro Shop
 
Hyperpro springs. Forks: SP-SU10-SSA004, $160. Shock: SP-SU10-SSB004, $110. Both: SP-SU10-SSC004, $249.95 from HyperPro
 
Racetech fork springs. FRSP S373210, available .85, .90, .95, 1.0kg. Stock is .76kg.
$110 from Racetech



Stock tires

Good deals on tires can be found at:



Brake Pads



Electric



Engine

Carbon Canister:

The hose on the left side of the canister vents behind the chin fairing. Pull that hose out from the chin fairing area and leave dangling. #1 hose (small diameter): Fuel tank vent to carbon canister. Pull this hose off the right side of the canister and route behind the chin fairing. *IMPORTANT* This hose must be vented to atmosphere. (Note from Satterfield I rerouted the #1 hose to eliminate the low spot to avoid problems with fuel being trapped in the low spot and not allowing the tank to vent properly. I don't have the chin fairing on and couldn't leave the stock routing anyway.)

#4 hose: Remove from right side of the canister. (This hose goes to the PCV and will be dealt with later.)

Remove the canister. Throw in a corner of the garage. (Anyone think it funny how large the bolts are that hold the canister to the brackets?) ------------------------

Carburetor Air Vent (CAV):

First, remove the tank and airbox. (If you haven't already removed the PAIR system, now would be a dandy time to do so, or at least disable it.) (Note from Satterfield Remove the entire system, plug the hole in the bottom of the air box and plug the small hose that controls the PAIR valve. Plug the hole on the PAIR check valve on each cylinder head.)

The PAIR valve is the one screwed to the bottom of the airbox. The CAV is between the carbs and has four hoses running into it, one small and three medium. (Note from Satterfield Both valves are controlled by hoses that are marked #10. They do not come from the same source.)

#10 hose (small diameter): Controls the CAV. Remove from the rear of the front intake port and block the port attachment with a small vacuum cap. (Note from Satterfield Better yet leave the hose on the intake manifold fitting and plug the end of the hose. Then use this as vacuum tap when syncing the carbs.)

#6 hoses (medium diameter, 2): Carb float bowl vents to CAV. Remove from the CAV and leave dangling between the carbs. *IMPORTANT* These hoses must be vented to atmosphere.

#4 hose: Goes to the PCV. Remove from the CAV and leave dangling.

Remove CAV bracket and pull out the CAV and one attached hose. ------------------------

Purge Control Valve:

The PCV resides behind the right radiator. In order to access it, the radiator bolts need to be removed and the radiator pulled out a little.

#11 hose (small diameter): Controls the PCV. Remove from the rear of the front intake port and block the port attachment with a small vacuum cap.

Hose #5 : From PCV to carbs. Remove the hose from the PCV to the T fitting near the carbs and block the T with a vacuum cap. (Note: from Satterfield I believe this is incorrect. The induction system is designed for #5 to pull air through the Evap Canister into the intake manifold. The bike runs very rich when these lines are plugged, I tried it. I use a small fuel filter in the line and vent to atmosphere.)

Remove PCV bracket bolt and pull out the PCV and three attached hoses. ------------------------

To double check, the front intake port should be blocked at two points (right beside each other). The carbs should have two vented hoses and two hoses meeting in a blocked T (see note above). The fuel vent hose should be vented. Everything else should be gone.

Re-install the airbox, don't miss re-connecting the four large hoses, two front, two rear. Re-connect the right radiator. Re-install the tank and fairing.

If your bike starts running like crap, you did something wrong - namely, blocking a hose that need to be vented.

--PROCEDURE-- To disable (or block) the PAIR valve:

-Remove the seat and tank (and PLEASE mark the vacuum/vent/fuel lines to the tank so you can remember which way to reinstall them!!! Not doing so may cause pain to yourself and the innocent little hard drive on the VTR list server.)

-Remove the rubber hoses going to each PAIR valve.

-Remove the two bolts holding each PAIR valve in place.

-Remove the PAIR valves.

-You will see a small screw holding the reed stopper and reed in place. Remove the screw, flip the reed stopper to hold the reed shut, and replace the screw.

-You just disabled PAIR.

-Put everything back together (3.6 ft-lb on the PAIR valve bolts)

--FOR THE OBSESSIVE/COMPULSIVE--

Now, if you're one of those guys/gals who is happy being fat (me), and really doesn't care to diet (me), but still wants to lose every .05 ounces of weight off the bike because it'll make you .00001 seconds quicker in the quarter mile, but you can still feel the increased acceleration by the "seat of the pants", plus it makes the bike handle sooooo much better (not me, but I did it anyway), follow the next few steps to remove the rest of the PAIR plumbing.

-Go to auto parts store and buy an assortment of small rubber vacuum caps and the larger ~3/4" dia. "coolant block-off caps". I found mine at Advance.

-Remove the seat and tank.

-Remove the airbox cover and airbox lower. Note that you must remove the air funnels. The longer one is on the rear.

-Disconnect all the hoses one by one that attach to the airbox, engine, and carbs.

-Replace each one with an appropriately sized rubber cap as you go. IIRC, there is one screw holding the control valve to the airbox.

-Yank the whole thing as one assembly.

-You will now be able to go faster and lean further than ever before now that all that excess weight is gone!

-Put everything back together.

I hope this has been helpful and informative to all those do-it-yourselfers out there in VTRdom. May it live in the list archives forever. Oh yeah, I take no responsibility whatsoever if you screw this up or drop little screws into your carb throats.



Exhaust Akrapovik 425-3000, 3002, 3402, 3402, 425 2521, 2230, 2231 41091 VTR1000... 97-02 Jardine RT One Slip On Aluminum Canister HON #18100912202



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